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Archive | Bivalve Spondylus

The demand for Spondylus shells to manufacture the famous Spondylus jewellry severely threatens the populations of this slow-growing animal

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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Typical Spondylus jewellry, using the wonderful colours of the small ring along the shell ends

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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A fishermen can collect some 400-500 shells within 2 or 3 days of diving only, but the bivalve is becoming more and more scarce

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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Spondylus serves as a host for a wide variety of epibionts

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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Living Spondylus in a natural habitat. The arrow points at the gap between the two valves which sometimes is the only difference between the bivalve and a well overgrown stone

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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Spondylus calcifer from the Ayangue area

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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These relatively “young” specimens are sold intact, as they still display the beautiful spines that disappear later in life

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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Spondylus princeps features a small attachment area, whereas Spondylus calcifer can be found attached to boulders and rocks with the whole left valve

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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A typical Spondylus princeps with spines

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Nazca admin

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