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Archive | Cnidaria (medusae and polyps)

Unidentified jellyfish

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

These animals, along with the other organisms belonging to the Cnidarian group, possess specialized stinging cells that use venom to capture and subdue their prey as well as to defend against potential predators. Continue Reading

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Unidentified jellyfish

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

Jellyfish have a gelatinous consistency since 95% of their bodies are made up of water. Continue Reading

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Psammocora stellata

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

 

Although this species has a slow growth rate (0.6 cm/year), its reproductive rate is high, which allows it to efficiently colonize uninhabited areas. Continue Reading

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Pocillopora sp

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

Branching corals are a very diverse group in the Easter Pacific.

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Tubastrea coccinea

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

These corals, with nocturnal habits and strong coloration, are very abundant in subtidal rocky zones. Continue Reading

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Pavona sp

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

These corals, reef-builders, have the capacity to create large structures up to 10 m in diameter an 5 m high. Continue Reading

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Eugorgia sp. (1), Heterogrogia verrucosa (2), Lophogorgia alba (3), Muricea fructicosa (4), Pacifigorgia sp. close-up (5).

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

 

 

Gorgonians, or sea fans, are sessile organisms that are very common in marine habitats with hard bottoms. Continue Reading

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Unidentified Zoanthid

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

Zooanthids are small anemones that, unlike others of their group, can form colonies of up to 10,000 individuals per square meter. Continue Reading

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Anthopleura sp. / Pachycerianthus fimbriatus

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

These solitary invertebrates, resembling flowers, are firmly adhered to the surfaces of rock, coral or other hard substrate. Occasionally they can also be found stuck to the shells of crabs, who use them as a defensive camouflage.

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Unidentified anemone.

Posted on 20 February 2013 by Nazca admin

Anemones are active predators, paralyzing their prey using microscopic venomous darts that are ejected from specialized tentacle cells when touched.

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